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In New Art in the Garden Exhibition, Bamboo is the Means; Meditation is the Process and Result

August 10th, 2012

For Immediate Release
Ingrid Arnett
PR and Communications Manager
Portland Japanese Garden
(503) 542-0288
iarnett@japanesegarden.com

Portland, Ore. — July 30, 2012 — In “Bamboo Art: Meditation and Transformation” running November 2–25, 2012 at the Portland Japanese Garden, three artists—Charissa Brock, Anne Crumpacker, and Jiro Yonezawa—whose medium is bamboo assemble a collection of works focused on the art and craft of working with bamboo as a life-affirming process for both the artist and the viewer. This is the third in the 2012 Art in the Garden series in which the Garden focuses on the theme of The Healing Garden.

“Creating art is my meditation,” says Portland artist Anne Crumpacker. “I crave the process of assembling the patterns.” Crumpacker credits her predilection for working with bamboo and the patterns found in nature to her formative travels and exposure to art in Japan. “Within Zen design, the circle or enso, represents enlightenment, as it is both bounded and boundless. Its edges are organic and irregular in form, symbolizing the imperfection that is part of existence.” Among her list of achievements is a June 2010 internship with Doug and Mike Starn during the acclaimed Big Bambú installation on the roof of the Metropolitan Museum of Art.

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions, Events


Largest Gift in Portland Japanese Garden History Received from The Harold and Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation

August 1st, 2012

Portland, Ore. — August 1, 2012 — The Portland Japanese Garden is pleased to announce the largest gift in its history, a $1,000,000 endowment donation from The Harold & Arlene Schnitzer CARE Foundation to establish The Arlene Schnitzer Curator of Culture, Art & Education.

“As a citizen of Oregon it is important to me to ensure the longevity of Portland’s prestigious Japanese Garden, which is considered to be one of the finest examples in the world outside of Japan,” says Arlene Schnitzer.  “I am thrilled, along with the other trustees, to help maintain the Garden’s celebrated status by granting a significant gift to their upcoming expansion capital campaign.”

Category: Organization


New and Returning Artisans from the Pacific Northwest and Japan Join the Japanese Garden’s Annual Art and Craft Sale

August 1st, 2012

Portland, OR – June 15, 2012 – The Portland Japanese Garden’s ninth annual Behind the Shoji Art and Craft Sale featuring more than 35 artisans will run from July 28–September 3, 2012.  Artist demonstrations will take place on Saturdays and Sundays at 11 a.m. 

Category: Events


The Portland Japanese Garden Explores the Relationship between Art and Healing in Threads of Hope: Art as Social Practice in the Textile Work of Hiroshi Saito

May 29th, 2012

Portland, Ore. —May 29, 2012 — The Portland Japanese Garden’s summer Art in the Garden exhibition, Threads of Hope: Art as Social Practice in the Textile Work of Hiroshi Saito, will feature approximately 50  beautifully dyed and handcrafted garments, scarves and wall hangings that express the joy of artistic creation while demonstrating Saito’s mastery of traditional dyeing techniques. The exhibition, which opens on June 8 and continues through July 1, features contemporary work which reflects the artist’s background in the world of traditional Kyoto kimono dyeing.

Saito believes strongly in the power of art to provide solace and inspiration, and has used his art to work with AIDS support groups, the disabled, and most recently with tsunami victims in Japan. As part of the exhibition, the Garden will display a section of the AIDS quilt Saito produced helped produce in Japan. While he is in Portland, Saito will also collaborate on community projects with Our House of Portland and the Cascade AIDS Project.

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions


Portland Japanese Garden Portrays the Healthful Practice of Chado, the Way of Tea

April 17th, 2012

Meditative Moments: Tea Ceramics by Richard Milgrim and Paintings by Hiroshi Senju

Portland, Ore. —March 12, 2012 — The Portland Japanese Garden’s first Art in the Garden exhibition of 2012, Meditative Moments: Tea Ceramics by Richard Milgrim and Paintings by Hiroshi Senju, will focus on the theme of tea and its influence on the arts, social customs, and healthful practices of Japan. The exhibition, which opens on April 6 and will continue until April 29, will portray tea ceramics created by Richard Milgrim in the context of Chado, the Way of Tea. Milgrim is an American ceramic artist who is recognized by Dr. Sen Genjitsu, the 15th generation Grand Master of the Urasenke School of Tea (retired) as an accomplished artist in the creation of tea ceramics. A 35-year resident of Japan, Milgrim has his own kiln in a mountain village north of Kyoto, as well as one in Concord, Massachusetts. Milgrim will travel to Portland for the opening of Meditative Moments on April 6.

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions


Portland Japanese Garden Presents the Year of the Healing Garden

January 26th, 2012

Art Exhibitions, Guest Lectures, and Wellness Programs Complement the Serenity of the Garden

Portland, Ore. — January 27, 2012 — In 2012, the Portland Japanese Garden will explore the role of gardens as places of healing through related exhibitions, guest lectures by horticultural therapists and experts from Western and Eastern medical traditions, morning yoga sessions with Yoga Pearl, and other activities. Working with partners at Legacy Emanuel and Legacy Good Samaritan Hospitals and the National College of Natural Medicine (NCNM) in Portland—¬both of which have healing gardens in their own spaces—the Japanese Garden will reach out to the community to consider “The Healing Garden” in all its many aspects.

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions, Events, Organization


Portland Japanese Garden Presents the Final Art in the Garden Exhibition of 2011

October 4th, 2011

Mottainai: The Fabric of Life: Lessons in Frugality from Traditional Japan

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Mary Keith Agnew
Portland Japanese Garden
mkeithagnew@japanesegarden.com
(503) 542-0288

 Melissa Wilmot
Portland Japanese Garden
mwilmot@japanesegarden.com
(503) 747-8816

 

Portland, Ore. — October 3, 2011 — The Portland Japanese Garden’s final Art in the Garden exhibition of 2011, Mottainai: The Fabric of Life: Lessons in Frugality from Traditional Japan, will present a unique collection of antique Japanese folk textiles from the Meiji period (1868-1912) and early 20th century. Mottainai means “nothing wasted” and demonstrates the remarkable ability of the Japanese to not only make do with the very little they had, but to make art with it. Beginning November 4 and continuing through November 27, the exhibition will feature selections from the private collections of Stephen Szczepanek (suh-PAN-eck) of Sri in Brooklyn and Kei Kawasaki of Gallery Kei in Kyoto.

Before World War II and the “economic miracle” that followed, Japan was a poor country, particularly in rural communities. Nothing was wasted, everything was recycled, and the word “mottainai” was a ubiquitous exclamation used by every frugal parent to warn children about wasting a bite of food or a scrap of cloth or paper. Most of the textiles and garments on view in this exhibition were made by women working from bast fibers foraged from the forest, or patched and quilted together from second-hand scraps of cotton garments of city-dwellers who traded their hand-me-downs with the farmers for rice and vegetables. This exhibition represents a wide variety of traditional textile making and decorating techniques, including sashiko stitching, bast fiber weaving and dyeing, and patchwork quilting.

“In this exhibition, we are considering the idea of ‘mottainai,’ one we believe fits well with the collective consciousness of those living here in Portland,” said Diane Durston, Curator of Culture, Arts and Education at the Portland Japanese Garden. “Through these remarkable collections of textiles on view in the Garden Pavilion, we hope to draw attention to these models of frugality and sustainability from generations past in traditional Japan.”

In advance of this exhibition, on October 27 the Japanese Garden Lecture Series will feature A Different Kind of Luxury: Japanese Lessons in Simple Living and Inner Abundance with acclaimed author and lecturer, Andy Couturier. On October 28, Couturier will lead a Writing in Nature workshop designed to help participants use writing to heighten perceptions and sensitivities to the nature that surrounds visitors at the Portland Japanese Garden. Collectors Szczepanek and Kawasaki will travel to Portland for the opening of the Mottainai exhibition on November 4.

This exhibition is supported in part by the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, the Regional Arts & Culture Council and Work for Art, Wessinger Foundation, and by Katherine and Mark Frandsen. Entrance is included with Garden admission and the exhibition will be open in the Pavilion during Garden hours. For more information about the Mottainai exhibition, visit http://japanesegarden.com/events/mottainai/.

# # #

The Portland Japanese Garden is the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan. Situated on more than 5 acres nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, the Garden features five traditional garden styles. The Garden is located above Washington Park at 611 SW Kingston Drive in SW Portland, Oregon and is open daily except on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. Visit the Garden online at www.japanesegarden.com.

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions


Portland Japanese Garden Announces New International Advisory Board

September 26th, 2011

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Melissa Wilmot
Portland Japanese Garden
mwilmot@japanesegarden.com, (503) 747-8816

Mary Keith Agnew
Portland Japanese Garden
mkeithagnew@japanesegarden.com, (503) 542-0288

October 27 Event at the Tokyo Nezu Museum to Introduce Board Members

Portland, Ore. —September 26, 2011 — The Portland Japanese Garden is pleased to announce the formation of the Portland Japanese Garden International Advisory Board (IAB). The IAB consists of a network of experts, scholars, philanthropists, and interested individuals who will work closely with the Garden on a variety of issues and objectives. Board members will foster connections between the Garden and its local, national, and international communities, and act as ambassadors and advocates of the Garden’s mission, vision, and programs. Members include Board Chair Carolyn A. Berry, John R. Anderson, Michael Christ, Jill Friedman, Masataka Hata, Ron Herman, John Jay, Yuichi and Amy Katoh, Joe Krakora, Toshiaki Kuno, Larry Murakami, Shiro Nakane, Koichi and Mihoko Nezu, Akira “Cap” Saheki, Arlene Schnitzer, Holly Shimizu, Robert Singer, Professor Makoto Suzuki, and Takashi Uyeno.

Through its combined efforts in community outreach, programming, major exhibitions, and Japanese garden design and maintenance instruction, the Garden’s influence and reputation for educational excellence and leadership has quickly spread throughout the world. The foundation of the IAB is a response to the Garden’s need for distinguished representatives who will help communicate with national and international audiences interested in Japanese gardening, aesthetics, community building and the exchange of information.

“The formation of this International Advisory Board was a critical next step for the Garden,” said Steve Bloom, the Garden’s CEO. “This group of distinguished leaders will help us foster and further our rapidly growing relationships with organizations, associations, and affiliate groups from all over the world. The Portland Japanese Garden has become a leader in preserving and furthering the culture associated with Japanese gardens, and the IAB will serve as vital support as we continue to implement and develop our strategic plan on a global scale.”

The Garden’s IAB members come from a variety of professional and philanthropic backgrounds, but all share the desire to engage with the community to further the mission and vision of the Portland Japanese Garden. The IAB will convene for its inaugural meeting in Tokyo, and then celebrate on October 27 at a Portland Japanese Garden event hosted by the ambassador of the embassy of the United States of America, Mr. John V. Roos and his wife, Mrs. Susan H. Roos; Director of the Nezu Museum and President of Tobu Department Stores, Mr. Koichi Nezu and his wife Mrs. Mihoko Nezu; and internationally renowned architect, Kengo Kuma; and held at the world-famous Nezu Museum. The event will be sponsored by Tiffany Japan. Learn more about the IAB at http://japanesegarden.com/IAB.

# # #

The Portland Japanese Garden is considered the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan. Situated on more than 5 acres nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, the Garden features five traditional garden styles. The Garden is located above Washington Park at 611 SW Kingston Drive in SW Portland, Oregon and is open daily except on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. Visit the Garden online at http://japanesegarden.com.

Category: Events, Organization


Behind the Shoji Art Show and Sale Offers Spectacular Array of Asian-Inspired Art

June 27th, 2011

Portland Japanese Garden

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Melissa Wilmot
Portland Japanese Garden
mwilmot@japanesegarden.com, (503) 747-8816

Mary Keith Agnew
Portland Japanese Garden
mkeithagnew@japanesegarden.com, (503) 542-0288

Behind the Shoji Art Show and Sale Offers Spectacular Array of Asian-Inspired Art at Portland Japanese Garden

Portland, Ore. — June 27, 2011 — An impressive collection of handmade ceramics, glass, jewelry, wood carvings, textiles, and more by 37 remarkable artists will be on display during this year’s Portland Japanese Garden Behind the Shoji Art Show and Sale. This one-of-a-kind annual art exhibit features Asian-inspired original artwork and unique gifts for sale—all within the setting of the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan.

“This is never the same show twice,” said Stephan Ferreira, the Garden’s Retail Operations Manager. “We are excited to present work by several new artists, and bring back some of the most popular artists from past years. In addition, the Garden is proud to feature on-site artist demonstrations throughout the run of the show.”

The show runs July 23 through September 5 in the Portland Japanese Garden Pavilion and is open during regular Garden hours (10 a.m.-7 p.m. Tuesday through Sunday and from noon-7 p.m. Mondays). The artist demonstrations will take place on the weekends throughout the show’s run starting at 11 a.m.  Entrance to the show is included with Garden admission.

Some of the show’s featured artists of note this year include Japanese woodcarver Masamichi Nitani, ceramic artist David Piper, metal artist Arnon Karamazov, and woodblock printmaker Walt Padgett, just to name a few.

For more information and a full list of artists featured in Behind the Shoji Art Show and Sale, visit http://japanesegarden.com/events/behind-the-shoji/.

# # #

The Portland Japanese Garden is considered the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan. Situated on more than 5 acres nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, the Garden features five traditional garden styles. The Garden is located above Washington Park at 611 SW Kingston Drive in SW Portland, Oregon and is open daily except on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. Visit the Garden online at www.japanesegarden.com.

Colleen Gallagher

John Benn

John Wirth

Rabun Thompson and Susan Levine

Arnon Kartmazov

Category: Events


Garden Presents Summer Art in the Garden Exhibition – Urban Green: Small Trees for Small Spaces

May 16th, 2011

Portland Japanese GardenFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Melissa Wilmot
Portland Japanese Garden
mwilmot@japanesegarden.com, (503) 747-8816

Mary Keith Agnew
Portland Japanese Garden
mkeithagnew@japanesegarden.com, (503) 542-0288

Portland Japanese Garden Presents Summer Art In the Garden Exhibition: Urban Green: Small Trees for Small Spaces

Portland, Ore. — May 16, 2011 — The Portland Japanese Garden will present Tokyo artist Kenji Kobayashi’s modern style of bonsai in the Summer 2011 Art in the Garden exhibition, Urban Green: Small Trees for Small Spaces.  Beginning May 27 and continuing through June 19, the show will feature Kobayashi’s exquisite miniaturizations of natural landscapes, a workshop conducted by Kobayashi, and two lectures by noted experts Jared Braiterman and David De Groot.

According to Jared Braiterman, founder of Tokyo Green Space, a research project on how green spaces make Tokyo a liveable city, “Bonsai shop Sinajina in Tokyo presents bonsai with a difference. Owner Kenji Kobayashi is widely acclaimed for modernizing the craft and fostering an appreciation of nature among a young urban clientele. Unlike the more formal practice of traditional bonsai masters, Kobayashi uses young plants and experiments with a much wider variety of containers and styles. ‘It’s not enough for city people to visit the countryside for a day,’ Kobayashi says. ‘They need to find a way to embrace it in their daily lives.’”

Kobayashi has a long connection with the Portland Japanese Garden. He started his career as a student of landscape architecture in Tokyo under Hachiro Sakakibara, one of the Garden’s former garden directors. During his time with Sakakibara, Kobayashi traveled to Portland to continue his studies. The Portland connection lives on in this exhibition through a collaboration with twelve Oregon potters who have made original containers in which Kobayashi will create finished bonsai on site during a two week residency at the Garden. These bonsai will then be featured in this exhibition.

“This exhibition introduces ways in which young Tokyo designers are bringing nature back into urban life in Tokyo,” said Diane Durston, curator of culture, art and education at the Portland Japanese Garden. “The collaboration with Oregon potters brings Mr. Kobayashi’s message home to us in Portland.”

The sold out workshop conducted by Kobayashi on May 24 will be an opportunity for participants to learn to plant and care for their own creations, and take home the finished product in a handmade original container made by ceramic artists of the Oregon Potter’s Association.

The Urban Green/Tokyo Style lecture by Jared Braiterman opens the exhibition on May 26. Braiterman will focus on his current research that examines how bringing nature into cities benefits both people and the environment. The Art of Saikei, a lecture and demonstration by David De Groot, is on June 16. Saikei means “landscape planting” and is a 20th century offshoot of bonsai. De Groot will introduce the art of saikei through words, images, and a demonstration in which he will explain the aesthetics and techniques involved as he creates a living saikei.

This exhibition is supported in part by the James F. and Marion L. Miller Foundation, the Jack & Lynne Hoffman Donor Advised Fund, and the Mark Spencer Hotel, and will be held in the Garden’s Pavilion. Entrance is included with Garden admission and the exhibition will be open during Garden hours. For more information about the Urban Green exhibition, visit http://japanesegarden.com/events/urbangreen/.

# # #

The Portland Japanese Garden is considered the most authentic Japanese garden outside of Japan. Situated on more than 5 acres nestled in the scenic west hills of Portland, the Garden features five traditional garden styles. The Garden is located above Washington Park at 611 SW Kingston Drive in SW Portland, Oregon and is open daily except on Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year’s. Visit the Garden online at www.japanesegarden.com.

Courtesy of Sinajina

Courtesy of Sinajina

Category: Art in the Garden Exhibitions, Events


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